SURE MethodTM | Suburban. Urban. Rural. Equipment.

How Sure Are You?

Choosing exactly the right equipment for the challenges you face can be a bit of a quandary. The Jerr-Dan SURE Method™ is a systematic way of designing and building towing equipment based on the specific performance demands of your business, your region and your customers.

It takes the guesswork out of the vehicle build process, and helps you ensure that your operation is running as efficiently as possible, by guiding you through a series of key considerations to define the optimum specifications for your vehicle. Don’t pay the price for not having the right equipment—be SURE that your vehicle is designed to go the distance.

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Key Factors

By working through the following key factors using the SURE Method™, a Jerr-Dan professional can help you efficiently determine your vehicle attributes so that your new unit is optimized for the specific performance and application needs of your business.

  • Your Region

    Do you operate in a primarily suburban, urban, or rural market? The dominant environment or terrain in your operating area begins to define the type of equipment that’s ‘right-sized’ for the maneuverability challenges you face in your region.

    Region
  • Your Intended Use

    Do you operate in a primarily suburban, urban, or rural market? The dominant environment or terrain in your operating area begins to define the type of equipment that’s ‘right-sized’ for the maneuverability challenges you face in your region.

    Use
  • Your Most Common Application

    Do you operate in a primarily suburban, urban, or rural market? The dominant environment or terrain in your operating area begins to define the type of equipment that’s ‘right-sized’ for the maneuverability challenges you face in your region.

    Application

Where Do You Operate?

Each of the following environments presents a unique set of challenges in optimizing the size, capacity and overall efficiency of your equipment choices.


What Is Your Intended Use?

In addition to environmental factors and performance expectations, tow professionals should thoroughly consider the tasks their tow vehicle will be most commonly engaged in: dedicated towing, recovery, or a combination of both.


Towing

Towing

Handling, maneuverability and towing capacity are all critical factors when designing the right unit for your operation.

Key factors

Recovery

Recovery

Though every job is unique, features like lifting capacity, anchor-ability and stabilization are the foundations of a solid recovery-focused vehicle.

Key factors

What Is Your Most Common Application?

The Jerr-Dan SURE Method™ relies on a specific formula for arriving at that “just right” mix of vehicle size, weight, capacity and application-specific features to efficiently manage your operation’s broad range of towing performance needs.

Steer Axle Weight

Think of the steer axle weight as a counterweight that balances the relationship between the wheelbase and the overhang portion of the load. This relationship is governed in part by the static weight of the front axle and is critical to determining the optimum chassis specifications for your next vehicle.

Length of WheelBase

Wheelbase length plays a critical role in overall tow performance as the principels of leverage are controlled in part by the distance between load and fulcrum. Wheelbase adjustments can be made, making the truck chassis longer or shorter to dial in the right balance of maneuverability and capacity for towing performance matched exactly to your needs.

Overhang

This distance, measured from the center of the rear axle to the center of the lifting apparatus, is a prime factor in determining the lift and load carrying characteristics of a tow vehicle. The overhang measurement will differ based on whether an under-lift with axle forks is utilized, a longer fork is employed, or a tire lift is your primary lift platform.


Tow Performance Worksheet

1
  • Suburban
  • Urban
  • Rural
2
SB1:
The distance from the center of the crossbar at the pick point to the end of the vehicle
SB2:
The distance from the center of the crossbar at the pick point to the end of the overhang obstruction (ex. Hose Reels/Aerial Buckets/Booms)
SB3:
Distance from the center of the crossbar at the pick point to the corner of the vehicle
SB4:
The distance from the center of the crossbar at the pick point to the farthest corner of the overhang obstruction
Casualty
Casualty
3
*Front Axle Weight/2
X
Wheel Base
/
Overhang
=
Tow Performance
*Be sure to incorporate front axle weight with Adjustable Performance Counterweight (APC) if required.
Formula Based on 50% Steer Axle Target Weight
4
Equipment RatingEffective ReachTow Performance
Retracted
Extended
1.) Max setback from step 2 must be less than your effective reach
2.) Tow Performance should be equal to or greater than the casualty
3.) Equipment Rating must be equal to or greater than Tow Performance
5
Front Axle Weight (FAW)
Rear Axle Weight (RAW)
Casualty Front Axle Weight
Casualty Rear Axle Weight

your Gross Combined Weight (GCW)

FAW ()/2
+
RAW
+
Casualty FAW
=
Total RAW
+
Casualty RAW
=
GCW

Tow Performance Calculator

As a tow professional, you know there’s nothing worse than tackling a job with less truck than you need. Take the guesswork out of the vehicle build process with our Tow Performance Calculator.

Go To The Tow Performance Calculator

Ready To Begin Optimizing Your Vehicle?

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